Friendly rivalry at State border for tonight’s State of Origin

Border marker sculpture lights up with blue and maroon

Tonight marks the third game in the 2016 State of Origin rugby league series and to celebrate the occasion, the prominent border marker sculpture at Tweed Heads/Coolangatta has been lit up with blue and maroon lights.


Photo: Mayor of Tweed, Councillor Katie Milne, Member for Tweed, Geoff Provest, Banora Point resident Alan Rolph, Member for Currumbin, Jann Stuckey and Gold Coast City Councillor for Division 14, Gail O’Neil, at the launch of the border marker lights.

The revamp was the suggestion of Banora Point resident Alan Rolph, who felt the marker was looking a little drab and wrote to his local member, Geoff Provest.

With the cooperation of his Queensland counterpart, Member for Currumbin, Jann Stuckey and Gold Coast and Tweed Shire councils, the border marker is now lit from below with blue and maroon lights, making a striking display as the sun goes down.

Mayor of Tweed, Councillor Katie Milne, said Tweed Shire Council maintains the border marker and the land surrounding it.
“We were happy to be involved in this cross-border collaboration, which highlights our friendship with our Queensland neighbours.” Councillor Milne said.

“It’s great to be putting some colour into the NSW/QLD border and at the same time making our lighting more sustainable.”
“The border marker is already a tourist attraction and lighting it with the blue and maroon lights in time for State of Origin 3 is going to create more interest and some friendly rivalry.

“In time, we will install environmentally-friendly LED lighting and colour combinations for other special events, such as green and Gold for the Commonwealth Games, red, black and yellow for NAIDOC Week or pink for breast cancer awareness,” she said.

Mr Rolph was at an informal ceremony as the lights turned on for the first time last night and was impressed.

“The idea came to me when I was sitting with friends at Twin Towns Services Club looking at the colour all around at night – except for the border marker, which looked dark and drab,” Mr Rolph said.

“My visitors always love to come down here to take photos – it’s very popular with tourists and will be even more so now.”

The border marker sculpture was erected in 2001 to mark the centenary of Federation.

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
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See also Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Tweed Heads/Coolangatta and Centaur Memorial and Walk of Remembrance

Nimbin Transfer Station upgrade makes recycling easier

This was originally published on 29/4/16, so the finishing touches have probably all been completed by now.

News Release:

There may be a few finishing touches to go, but the bulk of the Nimbin Transfer Station upgrade is complete, with a new drop-off area for waste and recycling.

Where it was previously messy and difficult to lift items into the skips, locals can now drive onto an elevated platform to quickly and easily place items in the three skips provided.

Council’s Waste Operations Coordinator Kevin Trustum said the upgrade also includes new security fencing and a new gatehouse, improved roads and better amenities. He said this work is still underway and urged residents to follow traffic control when on-site.

“We ask people to please be aware that the way you enter and exit the facility has changed, so just be mindful of this when you next visit,” Kevin said.

“The Nimbin Transfer Station was looking very old and tired, and was not up to today’s safety standards. These simple but essential works have made the facility a much more convenient and pleasant place for locals to visit.”

The Nimbin Transfer Station is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 9am to 3pm.

Courtesy: Lismore City Council Media
Originally published 29/4/16
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Lismore City Council acknowledges the people of the Bundjalung Nation, traditional custodians of the land on which we work.

Teaming up to fight bank erosion and weeds

Tweed Shire Council will work with participating private landowners to improve the health of the Rous River between Chillingham and Murwillumbah over the next three years, thanks to $100,000 in funding through the NSW Environmental Trust. 

The NSW Environmental Trust grant was announced last week by the Minister for Environment and Heritage, Mark Speakman and Member for Lismore, Thomas George. The grant will be matched by funds from Tweed Shire Council.

Rous_River_health_112517_640 Photo:  The health of the Rous River will be improved through a NSW Environmental Trust grant, matched by funding from Tweed Shire Council

Council Project Officer – Waterways, Matthew Bloor, said the Rous River has high conservation values and is located in a highly valuable agricultural landscape.  “Bank erosion and environmental weeds are having a big impact on the river but also threaten the values of adjacent land,” Mr Bloor said.

“In recognition of Council’s work with private landowners through its River Health Grants program, the NSW Environmental Trust has offered Council $100,000 to work with landowners to protect, restore and connect native riparian vegetation along the Rous River.”

Participating landowners will be eligible to receive assistance for stock fencing and watering infrastructure, weed control, bush regeneration, revegetation and bank erosion. Landowners will also receive management advice and restoration plans for their river bank based on current condition and use.

“Waterway health is directly related to the condition of banks and adjacent land. Landowners who take an active role in protecting the health of our waterways supply a vital service to the community and should be supported to do this.

“River Health Grants have supported around 160 landowners to improve over 65 kilometres of waterways in the Tweed Shire over the last 10 years. Council will match the Environmental Trust grant with $100,000 through this program to maximise the benefits this project will bring to the Rous River.”

Council to look into establishing a canoe trail along scenic Rous River

Council will also investigate establishing a canoe trail along the Rous River to promote the recreational use of the Rous River.

“Tidal reaches from Boat Harbour to Tumbulgum can be paddled year round.  Exploring our waterways in a canoe or kayak is a fun and healthy activity and great way to appreciate the unique environment of the Tweed Shire,” Mr Bloor said.

For more information contact Matthew Bloor, Project Officer – Waterways on (02) 6670 2580 or email

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Tuesday 31 May, 2016
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See also Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Murwillumbah and / Volcano Villages / Chillingham

Knox Park adventure playground scores regional award

Murwillumbah’s popular Knox Park adventure playground is in the running for a national award, after receiving regional recognition at prestigious industry awards.

The playground took out a Regional Award for Excellence in the ‘Playspace: Minor (less than $500,000)’ category at the Parks & Leisure Australia Awards for Excellence, competing against other projects from across NSW and the ACT.

The judges said the project had converted an area with little local appeal into a popular destination for children and families to get together and have fun.  “It’s a great park that provides for a wide range of users.  The project has improved public safety and subsequently increased its use,” the judges said.

“It’s an excellent combination of fixed equipment, natural environment and shade provision.”

The Knox Park project will now go on to compete for the national award at the Parks & Leisure Australia National Conference being held in Adelaide in October.

TSC Landscape Architect, Ian Bentley (centre)
Photo: Tweed Shire Council’s Landscape Architect, Ian Bentley (centre) accepts the regional award for the Knox Park playground from Parks & Leisure Australia NSW/ACT President, Les Munn (left) and Cricket NSW’s Manager State Infrastructure & Government Relations, Anthony Brooks

The adventure playground has been extremely popular with children and families since its completion in October last year. It was installed in the existing Peace Walk, to take advantage of the shade of existing trees and reinvigorate that section of the park.

The playground was designed to engage children in imaginative play that interacts with the natural surroundings.

It forms part of a $1.2 million youth precinct at the central Murwillumbah park, which also now features a plaza-style skate park and scooter precinct, an adventure playground with cutting-edge design features, as well as facilities for basketball, handball, soccer and netball.

The overall youth precinct was funded through a $500,000 Regional Development Australia grant from the Federal Government, $250,000 from the Murwillumbah Lions Club and $500,000 from Council.

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Friday 27 May, 2016
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See also: Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Murwillumbah

Restoring waterways of Cudgen plateau

Farmers and Council are working together to expand soil conservation projects on the Cudgen plateau.

The two-year project, funded by the NSW Environmental Trust and coordinated by Council, will expand soil conservation activities to restore 3.5 hectares of riparian land along 1.5 kilometres of Cudgen plateau waterways.

Farmers_Council_cudgen_115113_640 Photo: Farmers and Council are working together to expand soil conservation projects on the Cudgen plateau.

Five landholders will work with Council to minimise the loss of valuable topsoil from farms, improve aquatic and terrestrial biodiversity and connectivity and improve water quality of the local stream and the estuary it feeds into, Cudgen Creek.

The loss of topsoil remains the most significant environmental issue affecting the sustainability of the plateau’s farming activities, polluting local waterways, degrading riparian habitat and reducing productivity.

“The plateau is one of our most important areas of agricultural land, our future food bowl, and farmers need support to protect these production values and maintain the health of the local environment,” Council’s Program Leader – Sustainable Agriculture, Eli Szandala, said.

“The benefits of native vegetation in riparian areas, for both catchment health and on-farm production, are well documented.

“However, the expertise and resources required to undertake restoration works are limited for most farmers.”

Well-vegetated riparian areas capture sediments, nutrients and farm chemicals before they enter the waterway, stabilise stream banks, particularly during flood events, and improve aquatic ecosystems.

They also provide habitat for beneficial insects and predatory birds that prey on agricultural pests.

The project will revegetate and maintain more than one hectare of riparian land, planting 8000 native trees and other plants.  Weed control will also be undertaken throughout the project area to assist native regeneration and remnant vegetation.

Mr Szandala said stream bank stabilisation and improved drainage design and management would be undertaken where required, to further reduce sediments and contaminants entering the waterway.

“Community education is a key element of the project, with fact sheets, training and assistance to be provided to participating landholders and the community about managing soil erosion and improving farm productivity through environmentally beneficial techniques,” he said.

A workshop will showcase the benefits of native vegetation for intensive production systems and demonstrate the mutual benefits of farming and biodiversity conservation.

Council has gained support from North Coast Local Land Services, Tweed Landcare Incorporated, WetlandCare Australia, landholders and bush regenerators to help implement the project and share information.

“This project will strengthen past revegetation works, develop additional areas of native riparian vegetation and improve on-farm management practices for the benefit of farmers, the environment and the local economy,” he said.

For more information, contact Eli Szandala at or (02) 6670 2599.

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Friday 27 May, 2016
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See also: Big Volcano Towns : Kingscliff

Good news for Pottsville’s endangered koalas

A new koala project in the Pottsville Wetland will encourage community involvement to help protect and restore koala habitat.

A_koala_160834_640Photo: A koala in a newly planted tree shows how restoring koala habitat can help populations recover

The project will be funded by a grant of $99,283 over three years from the NSW Environmental Trust and a Tweed Shire Council cash and in-kind contribution of $170,000.

NSW Minister for Environment and Heritage, Mark Speakman announced the grant onsite at Pottsville on Monday 25th May.

The project aims to:

  • Increase primary koala habitat within and adjacent to the Pottsville Wetland
  • Reduce threats to koalas from domestic dogs
  • Reduce threats to other threatened fauna (such as ground nesting birds) from foxes and cats
  • Improve habitat condition and reduce weeds
  • Improve fire management
  • Involve the community and schools through koala conservation activities

Council’s Director Community and Natural Resources, Tracey Stinson, welcomed the funding.  “The Tweed Coast’s koala community was recently declared endangered by the NSW Scientific Committee, which just highlights the importance of projects such as this,” Ms Stinson said.

“Pottsville Wetland is a unique environmental asset at the back door of the Pottsville community that provides critical habitat for the declining Tweed Coast koala population,” Council’s Director Community and Natural Resources, Tracey Stinson, said.


Photo: An aerial view of the Pottsville Wetland which provides critical habitat for the declining Tweed Coast koala population

“As part of this project, we will engage with the community and encourage the active involvement of neighbours of the Pottsville Wetland and the broader community, so we can work together to protect and enhance Pottsville Wetland and its koalas.”

“As a bonus, this project will also benefit a host of other threatened species and Endangered Ecological Communities at this site as well as complementing similar actions Council is undertaking across 268 hectares of its adjoining coastal koala reserve system at Pottsville,” she said.

This project will form part of the overall Comprehensive Koala Plan of Management to help the Tweed Coast koala population recover to more sustainable levels over the next 20 years. For more information see

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Thursday 26 May, 2016
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See also: Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Villages / Cabarita, Pottsville Beach & Hastings Point