Tweed Draft Community Strategic Plan on display

‘Living and Loving the Tweed’

Draft Community Strategic Plan goes on public exhibition

On public exhibition for community comment from 2nd January 2017 to 25th February 2017, ‘Living and Loving the Tweed’ is the theme of Council’s Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027.

The primary purpose of the plan is to document the community’s priorities for the next decade and to define Council’s related goals, strategies and targets.

Mayor of Tweed, Councillor Katie Milne, said a comprehensive community engagement process over the 58 days of public exhibition will provide a variety of ways for people to learn more about this important Community Strategic Plan and provide further input.

“This plan aims to set out the community’s vision and Council’s commitment for the Tweed for the next 10 years,” she said.  “A lot of people are doing it tough and our environment is suffering too. The most effective strategies need to be identified so we can all flourish with our limited resources.

“We must urgently progress the opportunities of a better, fairer and more creative, clean, green future that is essential now more than ever with climate change. It’s imperative we get our priorities right so our future communities benefit rather than be left more vulnerable.

“The draft plan has been shaped by thousands of initial contributions and conversations from the community; through our shire-wide survey and many community engagement events.

“It’s important the whole spectrum of the community is represented in this plan and particularly in this final public exhibition period, so please have your say,” she said.

A series of community engagement events are across the Tweed this month to take the discussion out into the community.

A final version of the Community Strategic Plan will be adopted in mid-2017, accompanied by a delivery program which outlines the projects to be undertaken to achieve the plan’s broader visions.

To view the Draft Community Strategic Plan and for information on making a submission please visit http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/OnExhibition

For further background on the project, community engagement activities and the related ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ initiative, please visit: http://yoursaytweed.com.au/ttfio
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To view Tweed Shire Council media releases online visit http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/MediaCentre/MediaCentre.aspx

Murwillumbah Museum reopens

Last days to see breastplate exhibition
Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah reopened yesterday – Tuesday 17th January, 2017, after a temporary closure as a safety precaution during repairs to the building’s air conditioning system.

The Queensland Road facility was closed last week after a piece of the air conditioner ceiling ducting became loose, prompting concerns about public safety.

A solution to secure the ducting, to protect the safety of visitors and staff, has been put in place by Monday as an interim measure until full repairs to the air conditioning system can be completed.

Breastplates exhibition ends this Saturday

Only a few days remain to see one of the Museum’s most significant and thought-provoking exhibitions – of breastplates given to Aboriginal people associated with the Northern Rivers in the late 1800s and early 1900s – before the display ends this Saturday.

Current exhibitions also include some of the most beautiful butterflies from Australia, Asia and South America, featured in the Collector’s Cabinet until 25 February.

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Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah is located at 2 Queensland Rd, Murwillumbah and is open Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 4pm.

For further information about the Museum visit http://museum.tweed.nsw.gov.au/ or http://www.bigvolcano.com.au/community/trhs/index.html 

Photo captions:
1. Only a few days remain to see the thought-provoking Aboriginal breastplates exhibition at Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah. Photo by Justin Ealand.
2. The Richmond Birdwing featured in the Beautiful Butterflies exhibition on display in the Collector’s Cabinet until 25 February. Photo by Trevor Worden.

Don’t Flush! Council welcomes wet wipe legal action

Wipes in pipes clogging sewer systems

Tweed Shire Council (TSC) has welcomed news that the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has launched legal action against the manufacturers of ‘flushable’ wet wipes.

The ACCC is taking legal action against two manufacturers on the grounds that labelling the wipes ‘flushable’ is misleading, as it suggests consumers can safely flush them down the toilet.

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“This is great news not only for Tweed Shire Council but for all local government and water authorities worldwide,” said Manager Water and Wastewater Anthony Burnham.

“Wet wipes clogging our sewers and breaking our pumps is one of the daily challenges we face in keeping the Tweed’s sewer system operating.

“Every day we are called to an average of 20 blockages and most of them are caused by materials that should never be flushed, including wet wipes.

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Photo:  Water Engineer Elizabeth Seidl demonstrates that wet wipes do not break down (jar on left) like toilet paper does (jar on right). The wipe has remained intact in the water for five months to date.

“Australia-wide, the wet wipes problem is estimated to be costing the community up to $15 million a year in fees to remove the items from sewers, pump stations and treatment plants.”

Here in the Tweed, it takes two workers and a truck up to two hours to clear a blockage.

For each blockage, Council fitters have to travel to site, lift the pump with a crane truck, dismantle the pump, remove the blockage, re-assemble the pump and put the station back on line.

“Every time there is a blockage we also risk damaging the pump, the pipework and the electrical equipment, not to mention the excess power used by the pump trying to push the blockage through,” said Mr Burnham.

Council believes the legal action is a step forward in tackling the issue of consumers flushing these products, which do not break down.

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Photo: Reticulation Assistant Darryn Gunton fishes wet wipes and nappies from a sewer manhole at Murwillumbah.

“The next step is to educate consumers to keep wipes out of our pipes,” said Mr Burnham.

“It’s a message we hope will be heard loud and clear because if that blockage occurs on private property, it is the property owner who has to pay to unblock it. Then there’s the risk of raw sewerage overflow into neighbouring properties or the environment.”

Other items that should never be flushed are women’s sanitary products, medical dressings, cotton buds, condoms, colostomy bags and disposable nappies.

These materials should be bagged and disposed of in a rubbish bin.

To view media releases online visit http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/MediaCentre/MediaCentre.aspx
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Friendly rivalry at State border for tonight’s State of Origin

Border marker sculpture lights up with blue and maroon

Tonight marks the third game in the 2016 State of Origin rugby league series and to celebrate the occasion, the prominent border marker sculpture at Tweed Heads/Coolangatta has been lit up with blue and maroon lights.

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Photo: Mayor of Tweed, Councillor Katie Milne, Member for Tweed, Geoff Provest, Banora Point resident Alan Rolph, Member for Currumbin, Jann Stuckey and Gold Coast City Councillor for Division 14, Gail O’Neil, at the launch of the border marker lights.

The revamp was the suggestion of Banora Point resident Alan Rolph, who felt the marker was looking a little drab and wrote to his local member, Geoff Provest.

With the cooperation of his Queensland counterpart, Member for Currumbin, Jann Stuckey and Gold Coast and Tweed Shire councils, the border marker is now lit from below with blue and maroon lights, making a striking display as the sun goes down.

Mayor of Tweed, Councillor Katie Milne, said Tweed Shire Council maintains the border marker and the land surrounding it.
“We were happy to be involved in this cross-border collaboration, which highlights our friendship with our Queensland neighbours.” Councillor Milne said.

“It’s great to be putting some colour into the NSW/QLD border and at the same time making our lighting more sustainable.”
“The border marker is already a tourist attraction and lighting it with the blue and maroon lights in time for State of Origin 3 is going to create more interest and some friendly rivalry.

“In time, we will install environmentally-friendly LED lighting and colour combinations for other special events, such as green and Gold for the Commonwealth Games, red, black and yellow for NAIDOC Week or pink for breast cancer awareness,” she said.

Mr Rolph was at an informal ceremony as the lights turned on for the first time last night and was impressed.

“The idea came to me when I was sitting with friends at Twin Towns Services Club looking at the colour all around at night – except for the border marker, which looked dark and drab,” Mr Rolph said.

“My visitors always love to come down here to take photos – it’s very popular with tourists and will be even more so now.”

The border marker sculpture was erected in 2001 to mark the centenary of Federation.

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
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See also Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Tweed Heads/Coolangatta and Centaur Memorial and Walk of Remembrance

Nimbin Transfer Station upgrade makes recycling easier

This was originally published on 29/4/16, so the finishing touches have probably all been completed by now.

News Release:

There may be a few finishing touches to go, but the bulk of the Nimbin Transfer Station upgrade is complete, with a new drop-off area for waste and recycling.

Where it was previously messy and difficult to lift items into the skips, locals can now drive onto an elevated platform to quickly and easily place items in the three skips provided.

Council’s Waste Operations Coordinator Kevin Trustum said the upgrade also includes new security fencing and a new gatehouse, improved roads and better amenities. He said this work is still underway and urged residents to follow traffic control when on-site.

“We ask people to please be aware that the way you enter and exit the facility has changed, so just be mindful of this when you next visit,” Kevin said.

“The Nimbin Transfer Station was looking very old and tired, and was not up to today’s safety standards. These simple but essential works have made the facility a much more convenient and pleasant place for locals to visit.”

The Nimbin Transfer Station is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 9am to 3pm.

Courtesy: Lismore City Council Media
Originally published 29/4/16
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www.lismore.nsw.gov.au
Lismore City Council acknowledges the people of the Bundjalung Nation, traditional custodians of the land on which we work.

Teaming up to fight bank erosion and weeds

Tweed Shire Council will work with participating private landowners to improve the health of the Rous River between Chillingham and Murwillumbah over the next three years, thanks to $100,000 in funding through the NSW Environmental Trust. 

The NSW Environmental Trust grant was announced last week by the Minister for Environment and Heritage, Mark Speakman and Member for Lismore, Thomas George. The grant will be matched by funds from Tweed Shire Council.

Rous_River_health_112517_640 Photo:  The health of the Rous River will be improved through a NSW Environmental Trust grant, matched by funding from Tweed Shire Council

Council Project Officer – Waterways, Matthew Bloor, said the Rous River has high conservation values and is located in a highly valuable agricultural landscape.  “Bank erosion and environmental weeds are having a big impact on the river but also threaten the values of adjacent land,” Mr Bloor said.

“In recognition of Council’s work with private landowners through its River Health Grants program, the NSW Environmental Trust has offered Council $100,000 to work with landowners to protect, restore and connect native riparian vegetation along the Rous River.”

Participating landowners will be eligible to receive assistance for stock fencing and watering infrastructure, weed control, bush regeneration, revegetation and bank erosion. Landowners will also receive management advice and restoration plans for their river bank based on current condition and use.

“Waterway health is directly related to the condition of banks and adjacent land. Landowners who take an active role in protecting the health of our waterways supply a vital service to the community and should be supported to do this.

“River Health Grants have supported around 160 landowners to improve over 65 kilometres of waterways in the Tweed Shire over the last 10 years. Council will match the Environmental Trust grant with $100,000 through this program to maximise the benefits this project will bring to the Rous River.”

Council to look into establishing a canoe trail along scenic Rous River

Council will also investigate establishing a canoe trail along the Rous River to promote the recreational use of the Rous River.

“Tidal reaches from Boat Harbour to Tumbulgum can be paddled year round.  Exploring our waterways in a canoe or kayak is a fun and healthy activity and great way to appreciate the unique environment of the Tweed Shire,” Mr Bloor said.

For more information contact Matthew Bloor, Project Officer – Waterways on (02) 6670 2580 or email mbloor@tweed.nsw.gov.au

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Tuesday 31 May, 2016
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See also Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Murwillumbah and / Volcano Villages / Chillingham