Murwillumbah Museum reopens

Last days to see breastplate exhibition
Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah reopened yesterday – Tuesday 17th January, 2017, after a temporary closure as a safety precaution during repairs to the building’s air conditioning system.

The Queensland Road facility was closed last week after a piece of the air conditioner ceiling ducting became loose, prompting concerns about public safety.

A solution to secure the ducting, to protect the safety of visitors and staff, has been put in place by Monday as an interim measure until full repairs to the air conditioning system can be completed.

Breastplates exhibition ends this Saturday

Only a few days remain to see one of the Museum’s most significant and thought-provoking exhibitions – of breastplates given to Aboriginal people associated with the Northern Rivers in the late 1800s and early 1900s – before the display ends this Saturday.

Current exhibitions also include some of the most beautiful butterflies from Australia, Asia and South America, featured in the Collector’s Cabinet until 25 February.

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Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah is located at 2 Queensland Rd, Murwillumbah and is open Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 4pm.

For further information about the Museum visit http://museum.tweed.nsw.gov.au/ or http://www.bigvolcano.com.au/community/trhs/index.html 

Photo captions:
1. Only a few days remain to see the thought-provoking Aboriginal breastplates exhibition at Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah. Photo by Justin Ealand.
2. The Richmond Birdwing featured in the Beautiful Butterflies exhibition on display in the Collector’s Cabinet until 25 February. Photo by Trevor Worden.

Teaming up to fight bank erosion and weeds

Tweed Shire Council will work with participating private landowners to improve the health of the Rous River between Chillingham and Murwillumbah over the next three years, thanks to $100,000 in funding through the NSW Environmental Trust. 

The NSW Environmental Trust grant was announced last week by the Minister for Environment and Heritage, Mark Speakman and Member for Lismore, Thomas George. The grant will be matched by funds from Tweed Shire Council.

Rous_River_health_112517_640 Photo:  The health of the Rous River will be improved through a NSW Environmental Trust grant, matched by funding from Tweed Shire Council

Council Project Officer – Waterways, Matthew Bloor, said the Rous River has high conservation values and is located in a highly valuable agricultural landscape.  “Bank erosion and environmental weeds are having a big impact on the river but also threaten the values of adjacent land,” Mr Bloor said.

“In recognition of Council’s work with private landowners through its River Health Grants program, the NSW Environmental Trust has offered Council $100,000 to work with landowners to protect, restore and connect native riparian vegetation along the Rous River.”

Participating landowners will be eligible to receive assistance for stock fencing and watering infrastructure, weed control, bush regeneration, revegetation and bank erosion. Landowners will also receive management advice and restoration plans for their river bank based on current condition and use.

“Waterway health is directly related to the condition of banks and adjacent land. Landowners who take an active role in protecting the health of our waterways supply a vital service to the community and should be supported to do this.

“River Health Grants have supported around 160 landowners to improve over 65 kilometres of waterways in the Tweed Shire over the last 10 years. Council will match the Environmental Trust grant with $100,000 through this program to maximise the benefits this project will bring to the Rous River.”

Council to look into establishing a canoe trail along scenic Rous River

Council will also investigate establishing a canoe trail along the Rous River to promote the recreational use of the Rous River.

“Tidal reaches from Boat Harbour to Tumbulgum can be paddled year round.  Exploring our waterways in a canoe or kayak is a fun and healthy activity and great way to appreciate the unique environment of the Tweed Shire,” Mr Bloor said.

For more information contact Matthew Bloor, Project Officer – Waterways on (02) 6670 2580 or email mbloor@tweed.nsw.gov.au

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
Tuesday 31 May, 2016
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See also Big Volcano Visitor Guide / Volcano Towns / Murwillumbah and / Volcano Villages / Chillingham

Adding colour to the art of skate

Murwillumbah’s new Knox Park skate facility is now open and attracting skaters of all ages and experience levels to the area.

Local skate shop owner and graffiti artist Tony Lawrence has been engaged by Council to undertake an urban art project on the park and said he had seen it gain huge popularity in a short length of time.

“Our skate park has a great vibe and is attracting a variety of community members, from young families to professional skateboarders,” Mr Lawrence said.

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Photo:  Pharside Skate Shop owner and graffiti artist Tony Lawrence with Urban artwork plans for Murwillumbah’s new Knox Park skate facility, and local skater Michael Mitchell getting some air.

Knox Park facility attracts keen skaters of all ages

“The modern facility caters for all levels of ability and will be sure to produce some new local talent.”

Council’s Landscape Architect, Ian Bentley, helped designed the Youth Precinct and said Mr Lawrence would create a total of three different artworks that would give the half-pipes and bowls a local touch.   “The works are to go on the exposed retaining walls throughout the skate park, and the main one will capture some of the Tweed’s local natural assets,” Mr Bentley said.

“If all goes to plan, Tony will be able to start work in late February.”

Mayor of Tweed Councillor Katie Milne said: “Skaters say this skate park is ‘sick’. Council takes the job of bringing more fun to town very seriously so we’re stoked with the ‘sick’ endorsement.”

“The graffiti art project will be awesome too – it’s going to really liven up the place and show off scenes of our natural assets in a new, cool and very vibrant light.”

The skate park is part of the first stage of a $1.2 million upgrade to Knox Park, funded by a $250,000 donation from the Lions Club of Murwillumbah, a $500,000 Regional Development Australia grant from the Federal Government and $500,000 from Council.

Stage 1 also includes an adventure playground, new shelters, barbecue facilities and pathways, which was completed and opened late last year.  Council is planning an official opening of the Youth Precinct later this year.

For more information visit www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/knoxparkupgrade

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See also: Katch Periscope video Knox Park Skate Park, January 2016.

Byron Bay Lighthouse hang gliding

Byron Bay lighthouse hang gliding preparation experience with Byron Airwaves video here >  http://ow.ly/YG0mQ

A #periscope video we made in Byron Bay yesterday, with lots of breezy sound effects. 

We’re still getting the hang of on-the-fly periscopes (if you’ll excuse the terrible almost puns), but hope you’ll enjoy this video of 20 minutes or so, showing preparations for jumping off a cliff at Cape Byron, and taking flight like a bird.

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Photo: Motorised glider departs Tyagarah airfield* © by Big Volcano Tourism

For more info on Byron Bay visit http://www.bigvolcano.com.au/places/byronbay.htm

For more info on Adventure, Outdoors & Thrill seekers Activities in our region, visit http://www.bigvolcano.com.au/active/thrills.htm

*Tyagarah airfield is 20 minutes north of Byron Bay and home to the Gliding club, gliding operators, sky diving, hot air ballooning, and micro light tours and activities.

Free community breakfast to celebrate Razorback reopening

Celebration to highlight Joongurrabah’s significance

A free community breakfast will be held at Tom Beatson Outlook this Friday at 7.30am (NSW time), to celebrate the popular Tweed Heads park’s reopening following its upgrade late last year.

The refurbishment included construction of new safety railing along the walkway up to the outlook, as well as a minor facelift for its shelters, tables and seating.

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The outlook, commonly known as Razorback, was closed in April because of safety concerns about the existing railing and reopened to the public in time for Christmas.

“While people have been enjoying renewed access to the outlook during the holiday period, we wanted to have a community celebration because of Razorback’s importance to so many people,” Council’s Director Community and Natural Resources, Tracey Stinson, said.

“Community consultation during the outlook’s closure showed how many people regularly visit Razorback for recreation, to show visitors to the area or for major milestones in their lives.

“A special breakfast seemed the best option for the celebration because the outlook is a popular destination for a lot of people on their morning walks.

“We’re also inviting people who have never been to Tom Beatson Outlook to come along and see why Razorback means so much to so many people,” she said.

“Importantly, Friday’s celebration will recognise and explain Razorback’s great significance to the local Aboriginal community, which knows the location as ‘Joongurrabah’.”

Joongurrabah is listed as a place of cultural significance in the Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act.

Ms Stinson said Council was highly conscious of the lookout’s importance to many members of the community and found a safe and cost-effective option to reopen the walkway as soon as possible.

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Courtesy Tweed Shire Council Newsroom.

See also Big Volcano Natural and Scenic Attractions guide and Minjungbal Aboriginal Cultural Centre

Jam-packed January at Tweed Regional Museum

Activities for kids, historic holiday exhibition and more opportunities to visit

Murwillumbah’s Tweed Regional Museum is well and truly in the school holiday spirit, kicking off special Saturday trading hours and bringing back a popular exhibition that gives a nostalgic look at the Tweed’s beach culture.

Museum Director Judy Kean said the facility usually opened on the first Saturday of each month but in January would open every Saturday.

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Photo caption: View of a museum display from the mezzanine floor, © by Big Volcano Tourism

“We know that the post-Christmas and New Year period before school goes back is often a time when families and visitors are looking for something to do and somewhere to go,” Ms Kean said.

“During January we will also have a number of activities set up in the courtyard for children to enjoy, including activities related to a shipwreck exhibition and the Brick by Brick: Build your own capital interactive exhibition that has been available at Murwillumbah Library recently.

“Children can try their hands at building some local historic buildings out of LEGO, including the 1915 Shire Hall and the Fingal Lighthouse.”

Ms Kean said an exhibition about the Tweed’s beach history was back by popular demand.

“Holidays and Hokey Pokey: Tweed Beach Images features images and video footage from the collection, including some wonderful footage by Charles Simpson,” she said.

“Images include postcards dating from the early 1900s when the area first became popular as a holiday destination, crowded beaches during the 1950s and ’60s, holiday makers promenading in Tweed Street, crowded campgrounds at Tweed Heads around 1910, images of the famous Boyd brothers hauling in nets full of fish off Greenmount Beach around 1950, as well as Hokey Pokey contests and girls trying out Malibu boards at Greenmount in 1961.”

Ms Kean said the footage would be on continual loop in large format on the Keith and Norman Tong Images of the Tweed Wall throughout January.

January opening hours for Tweed Regional Museum, Murwillumbah:
•    Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 4pm
•    Every Saturday until 30 January, 10am – 4pm

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Courtesy Tweed Shire Council Newsroom.

See also Big Volcano Amusements, Cinemas & Indoor Entertainment guide and Big Volcano Museums, Historic Places and Heritage Buildings