A few of your favourite things

Mullumbimby artist Oksana Waterfall showcasing work at Tweed Regional Gallery.

Lelli_2015_thr142809_640Photo:  Lelli (detail) 2015, graphite, thread and found object on paper

Hailing from Mullumbimby, artist Oksana Waterfall’s  showcase “Object of Affection”, is a series of works on display until Sunday 10 July 2016 at Tweed Regional Gallery, that explores how people select their most treasured items.

Reflecting the artist’s Ukrainian heritage, where intricate embroidered fabric is often regarded as a family heirloom, Ms Waterfall said that “It is the thread of memory for me and I have incorporated it into each work… a thread that binds me to my culture and my past, and a thread of mark-making that links all the works in the series”.

She said her long and abiding interest in people and the objects they bonded with in the course of their lives were part of the inspiration for her work.  “We all tend to accumulate things as we move through the world,” she said.

“Amongst the myriad of objects that pass through our hands, there are some that seem to exert a special attraction and influence over us.  “As an artist, it intrigues me that people often cling to the mundane as valuable; this can be an object from their childhood or a present from a friend, sometimes without intrinsic value except to the owner,” she said.

“It can be commonplace or uncommon, rare or simply charged with the value of personal use.”  The artist said patterns and stories started to emerge amongst the myriad of random objects.

“We can tell a lot about the owners from the objects they choose as sentiment finds its way into their choices and mundane objects become supercharged with emotions and distilled memories,” Ms Waterfall said.

Gallery Director Susi Muddiman said visitors would be intrigued by the seemingly simple works. “Closer observations reveal the intricate detail involved in Oksana’s practice,” Ms Muddiman commented.

“She tells the story of people through the things they selected and the things they treasure. She specifically asks people to nominate the objects that are most precious to them. “Surprisingly, people didn’t always select the most valuable thing they own and these often remain as impersonal objects to them.

“It is often object, plus memory, that equals a favourite thing.”

Courtesy: Tweed Shire Council Newsroom
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See also: Big Volcano Visitor GuideTweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre

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Wanderlust exhibition tells tales of travel

The Southern Lights of Antarctica, Mexico’s Day of the Dead, a Cairo camel market and sight-seeing in Florence are just a few of the experiences portrayed in a new exhibition currently showing at the Tweed Regional Gallery in Murwillumbah.

Renowned Australian artist Wendy Sharpe is showcasing a wide range of works from her explorations over the last ten years in an exhibition titled WANDERLUST: work from recent travel, on display at the Gallery from 22 April to 25 September 2016.

Wendy_Sharpe,_Cairo_Café,_2008130734_640 Caption: Wendy Sharpe, Cairo Cafe, 2008

Ms Sharpe said her love for travel started in her twenties, when she won the Marten Bequest Travelling Scholarship to Europe.

“I was awarded a three-month studio residency through the Art Gallery of NSW at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris,” she said.

“I lived in London with my grandfather for six months and from there I travelled to New York and around Europe for the following 18 months. Over the years, travel has become an integral part of my life and work – I now spend part of every year in my apartment/studio in Paris’s Montmartre district.”

The exhibition also includes work from her residency as a special guest at the Australian Embassy Residence in Egypt, and two residencies in Antarctica with the Mawson’s Hut Foundation.  “Among the works on paper there are views from an attic apartment overlooking the terracotta roofs and ancient towers of Florence, views over a camel market in Cairo, from the balcony of my apartment in Paris and parades taking place all over the world.

Ms Sharpe said her experience of the famous Day of the Dead festival came about when she was given a residency in Oaxaca, Mexico in 2014.   “I was able to immerse myself in the amazing spectacle of the parades, masks, the paper-maché skeletons and all of the wonderful folk art.”

Wendy_Sharpe,_Woman_with_Roses_–_D130716_640 Caption: Wendy Sharpe, Woman with Roses – Day of the Dead, 2014

“My first trip to Antarctica in 2012 was a commemorative voyage, celebrating the centenary of Australian explorer Mawson’s voyage,” she said.

“I was on an icebreaker, the Aurora Australis, for over six weeks, the only artist among scientists. This gave me the opportunity to study the extraordinary colours of the Antarctic landscape, and I became fascinated with the sky, in particular with the phenomenon of the Southern Lights.

Other works in WANDERLUST were made during travels to Italy, India, Morocco, France and Spain.

Courtesy Tweed Shire Council Newsroom.

Originally published Wednesday, 13 April 2016

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Tweed Regional Gallery is open 10am-5pm Wednesday to Sunday.

See also Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre – Big Volcano Visitor Guide and Big Volcano Artists, Designers & Studios guide.

Tweed Regional Gallery popular these holidays

Thousands of holiday makers took the opportunity to visit Tweed Regional Gallery and the Margaret Olley Art Centre as attendances spiked at the Gallery during the Christmas and New Year period. 20141008_141243_248

Over 7000 people attended the Gallery during the three weeks from 17 December to 4 January, more than doubling attendances to the Murwillumbah-based gallery during the corresponding period the previous year.

“It was our first Christmas since the opening of the Margaret Olley Art Centre (MOAC) in March and the influx of visitors was amazing,” Gallery Director Susi Muddiman said.

Attendances peaked at just over 3000 people during the first week of January, replicating levels experienced during the first few weeks after MOAC opened.

Miss Muddiman attributed the recent high attendances to a flow of visitors into the region for Christmas holiday, as well as a new feature exhibition in MOAC.

The Yellow Room exhibition celebrates the late artist’s “sanctuary” and favourite room in her Sydney home.

The Yellow Room is one of the rooms featured in the permanent MOAC exhibition, which includes an exact recreation of iconic sections of the iconic painter’s Duxford Street house in Paddington.

“While MOAC is a permanent attraction in Tweed Regional Gallery, special temporary exhibitions will be featured within MOAC to celebrate particular aspects of the artist and her works,” Ms Muddiman said.

The Yellow Room: Margaret Olley is on display until 15 March 2015.

TSC Media Release, Thursday 8 January, 2015

See more about the TRG at Big Volcano.

P.S.  If you haven’t been to the gallery yet, you should, especially to see the MOAC “Yellow Room” display before it finishes in March.