Mt Warning Road and National Park reopens tomorrow

350 road flood jobs done, 1200 to go

Mt Warning Road has been made safe following the March 30 floods and will reopen to all motorists on Monday (29 May 2017) under stop/go traffic control.

The National Park will reopen from Monday as well.

korrumbynCrk_MtWarningRd_2142_M600Photo: Korrumbyn Creek, Mt Warning Road 2013.  J. Palmer 

Flood repair works on the road will continue for some time yet as only the critical safety repairs have been completed to date. At some time, the road may need to be closed again as additional repair work is scheduled.

Motorists are advised to watch for traffic controllers on Mt Warning Road and other Tweed roads as flood repair works continue. In particular, they are urged to take extra caution even after light rain as many roadside environs are still saturated and prone to slippage and rock falls in the wet.

“The road you travel on today may not be the same road tomorrow,” said Manager Infrastructure Delivery Tim Mackney. “Please expect the unexpected, especially after rain.”

Council’s road network sustained considerable damage in the floods, with more than 1500 individual road and bridge defects identified. To date, Council staff and contractors have completed around 350 of the simpler and most urgent repairs.

Council is engaging more contractors to help continue the flood restoration works as Council staff must begin to return to Council’s normal program of construction works.

“Realistically, it will be 12 months before we have most of the damage fixed,” said Mr Mackney. “Some more complicated or lower-priority jobs may take up to three years before they can be scheduled and completed.

“We ask Tweed motorists to be patient as we work through this significant list.”

Repairs are prioritised based on a number of factors, including safety.

– ends –

To view all Tweed Shire Council media releases online, please visit the Tweed Shire Council Newsroom.

See also WOLLUMBIN (MOUNT WARNING) NATIONAL PARK and Mount Warning Climb – The Big Climb.

Tweed and Lismore road closure updates

Thursday 13 April, 2017

Tweed roads open but many hazards demand extreme care

All Tweed Shire Council roads bar two are trafficable and all communities have access in and out of their properties.

Council has successfully negotiated to push a temporary track through private property to restore access around the catastrophic failure of Manns Road at Rowlands Creek. This work will start after Easter.  Investigations are continuing in how to repair Lone Pine Road at Doon Doon, where one property is isolated.

Council will install temporary traffic lights on Clothiers Creek Road to improve safety at the one-lane section skirting a major landslip.

Council advises that while Mount Warning Road is trafficable as far as the National Parks gate and businesses there are open, the summit track is closed to visitors as repairs to scours and slip damage are being undertaken.  Road repairs will continue on Mount Warning Road over the next month as Council works to restore this important tourist destination in sync with the National Parks and Wildlife Service restoring the walking track.

At the request of National Parks, traffic controllers will be mobilised to Mount Warning Road to stop pedestrians walking through the roadwork sites to get into the National Park.

Council is continuing to retrieve materials from the washed-away Byrrill Creek bridge to rebuild a temporary one-lane timber bridge on the same alignment to restore more direct access for this community while assessing options for a permanent replacement bridge.

The temporary bridge will take at least one month to build so residents are advised that they will have to continue travelling via Tyalgum, or Cadell and Kyogle roads until then.

While roads are now trafficable, many are not in good condition and motorists should drive expecting multiple hazards.
Not only are some of the landslips still moving but road edges are soft and temporary patching of road scours and potholes may deteriorate quickly. Council expects it will take several weeks to clear topside slips.

Motorists also are advised to expect gravel and stone deposits on roads and to avoid hitting this type of debris at speed.

Over the past two weeks, Council has worked beyond its normal road maintenance limits to clear property access routes through road reserves. However, it cannot clear access routes on private property and owners are advised to contact the Recovery Centre by telephoning 6670 2133 for advice on what options they may have.

To view all Tweed Shire Council media releases online, please visit the Tweed Shire Council Newsroom.

Council urges patience for those affected by road closures

Lismore City Council is urging patience from rural residents as some of the major road closures caused by the recent natural disaster could take months to repair.   All residents will have emergency services access by the end of today (Thursday 13th) and be able to reach Lismore, however, for some this means a much longer trip than usual.

Council is now compiling detailed damage assessments for a disaster relief application to the Commonwealth-State National Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements (NDRRA). Rough estimates suggest the total damage bill from the flood could be well over $40 million.

Once assessments are finalised in the next three weeks, the NSW Government will need to assess Council’s claim and undertake geotechnical reports before disaster relief funding can be issued.   This is not a process Council can speed up, except to ensure that Lismore’s claim is submitted to the NSW Government soon as possible so the natural disaster funding process can get underway.

“We understand for some residents this seems like a long time, but disaster recovery is a lengthy and complicated process, and the work must be done right,” Mayor Isaac Smith said.   “Some of the landslips we are dealing with are quite serious, and are also very expensive to repair. We are relying on disaster relief in order to complete these works.”

Council is now in the process of restarting its regular roadworks program, which Mayor Isaac Smith says is good news for local ratepayers.   “Council’s own resources used during ‘normal’ work hours aren’t eligible to be covered under the natural disaster funding,” he explained.   “Using our crews on the regular roadworks schedule and contracting out the flood repairs gives ratepayers the best bang for their buck. Council acknowledges this will be frustrating for some ratepayers, but is ultimately the best outcome for the Lismore Local Government Area.”

Roads still subject to closure are:

  • Boatharbour Road (culvert collapse).
  • Cawongla Road (landslip).
  • Keerrong Road (landslip).
  • Koonorigan Road (landslip).
  • Oakey Creek Road (culvert washed away).
  • Suffolk Road off Blue Knob Road (culvert washed way – repairs currently taking place).

For road closure updates, visit http://www.myroadinfo.com.au http://www.myroadinfo.com.au.

-ends-        

http://www.lismore.nsw.gov.au/

Lismore City Council acknowledges the people of the Bundjalung Nation, traditional custodians of the land on which we work.  

Council’s new warning on emerging road hazards

Recovery work to focus on roads and bridges 

Council is urging community members to slow down on the region’s roads as ongoing flood clean-up work continues and traffic volumes return to normal levels.

Council’s Director of Engineering David Oxenham said flood debris, slips and mud are being cleared but new hazards are emerging.
“The heavy rain has damaged the road surface in many areas which means small pot holes and soft edges can quickly become major unexpected hazards, particularly for motorcycle riders and cyclists,” he said.

“Vehicles travelling at speed can cause more damage to the road surface so I urge community members to take care for their own safety and the safety of our road crews who are working long hours to repair the damage.”

Council and its contractors this week move their focus from making roads passable and reconnecting isolated communities to starting to restore the roads for safe travel.

The first priority will be to stabilise topside slips, remove rocks and tree debris, clear table drains and any built-up deposits of soil, gravel, shale or bitumen.  Crews also will clean in and around pits, culverts and bridges and record any dangerous slips.

The roads to be worked on first include: Urliup, Hogans, Mt Warning, Tomewin and Garden of Eden, Tyalgum and Tyalgum Creek, Numinbah, Kyogle, Clothiers Creek, Stokers, Reserve Creek, Carool, Doon Doon and Commissioners Creek roads.

Manns Road at Rowlands Creek and Lone Pine Road at Commissioners Creek remain closed.

Council urges all motorists to be prepared for workers on roads throughout the shire and to take extreme care as the soils remain saturated and new landslips cannot be ruled out.

Residents can get the latest information on the road network via http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/RoadWorks]. The information also is available on http://www.myroadinfo.com.au/], together with information from neighbouring shires.

– ends –

Visit our Newsroom http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/Newsroom] page to view all media releases online.

Tweed Shire road closures

Wednesday 5 April, 2017

Nine roads cut or closed with some school bus services affected

Council prioritising repairs and urgent stabilisation work

Council is continuing to work today to repair damaged roads that are extremely dangerous or where communities are still isolated.

Council is working to keep the MyRoadsInfo site up to date but alternatively residents can find the latest list of road condition reports and closures on the Council website at http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/RoadWorks.

This is updated twice a day.

Council is advising heavy vehicle operators that Clothiers Creek Road between Norths Lane and Condor Place is reducing the weight limit applied to 4.5t due to slip damage to the road. Heavy vehicle operators need to use alternate routes which may have an impact on school bus services that use this road.

Today, Council has prioritised work on nine roads that are closed because they are too dangerous or impassable.

They are: Mt Warning, Tomewin, Manns, Couchy Creek, Dungay Creek, Palmvale, Porters, Solomons and Spring Valley roads.

The damage to some of these roads has small communities still isolated.

Council also is assessing the condition of Byrrill Creek Bridge to get a temporary repair as soon as possible. Any repair may still take three to four weeks.

Today Council also will be working on Piggabeen Road Bridge No 155 (timber bridge) to effect temporary repairs.

Priority roads are being washed free of mud and dirt once waters have receded sufficiently, including Tweed Valley Way and Bartletts Road which are carrying heavy traffic taking loads of rubbish and flood debris to the tip at Stotts Creek.

Today Council is closing Riverside Drive, Tumbulgum, to emergency services vehicles and local residents only, as heavy flows of sight-seeing traffic is hampering efforts to clean Tumbulgum, and for Council’s Water and Wastewater Unit to access properties to get the entire sewerage system cleared of blockages and operational.

“The information we are providing is the best source of truth we have but in emergency situations where access is difficult and, given that Council lost 90 per cent of its own fleet, our information may not be complete,” said Director Engineering David Oxenham.

“Residents can contact Council on 6670 2400 to report any major road damage not listed below but we ask you not to report portholes or minor damage at this stage.

“Over the coming weeks, our crews will get out on every road and assess the damage to compile our program of works to repair.”

To view the full list of updated road closures please visit: http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/RoadWorks.

This is updated twice a day.

Wednesday 5 April, 2017

– ends –

To view Tweed Shire Council media releases online visit http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/MediaCentre/MediaCentre.aspx